Celiac Disease In Kids Detected By Growth Screenings

Measuring children’s height and weight as they grow can be a powerful indicator of whether they have the digestive condition called celiac disease, and may help doctors diagnose children with the disorder earlier, a new study finds.

When used together, five calculations that are done based a child’s height and weight — such as how much a child’s height varies from the average for age and gender, and how this measure changes over time — were able to detect celiac disease in 84 percent of boys and 88 percent of girls with the disorder, according to the study, published online today (March 2) in the journal JAMA Pediatrics.

via Celiac Disease In Kids Detected By Growth Screenings.

Celiac Disease Is Real – Gluten Sensitivity, Not So Much

Non-celiac gluten sensitivity is being heavily promoted by people selling new diet lifestyles and food marketing groups are happy to chime in – the same way you can buy non-GMO rock salt that is certified by the Non-GMO Project, you can have labels proclaiming that something is gluten-free, because it had no gluten in the first place.

via Celiac Disease Is Real – Gluten Sensitivity, Not So Much.

Burgers recalled for gluten contamination: Celiac disease warning

Campos Foods is recalling its H-E-B beef burgers because they contain wheat, but it is not listed on the packages. The recall affects several varieties of the H-E-B beef burgers, and consumers who are allergic to wheat, have celiac disease or gluten sensitivities are being encouraged to dispose of the product. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) has confirmed the recall and labeled it a Class II.

Campos Foods is recalling two types of packages containing H-E-B fully cooked thick n’ tasty cheese burgers. The 15-ounce and 30-ounce bags, which contain 3.75-ounce beef burgers, are mislabeled. In addition, the H-E-B fully cooked thick n’ tasty bacon cheese burgers sold in 30-ounce bags are being recalled. Both the cheese burgers and the bacon cheese burgers sold in 15-pound cases are also part of the recall. All of the packages have EST. 2260 T stamped in the USDA mark of inspection.

via Burgers recalled for gluten contamination: Celiac disease warning – EmaxHealth.

Those with Celiac Disease can soon guzzle new gluten-free Coors beer

Gluten free is going mainstream.

The maker of Coors Light and Miller Light is launching its first gluten-free beer in February, calling it Coors Peak.

The lager is a brand new beer that will be a little more full-bodied and more flavorful than a standard Coors Light, a spokesman said.

The company, MillerCoors, will only make the beer available in Portland and Seattle at first as it tests the market. Expect to see it in grocery stores and some restaurants and bars.

via Those with Celiac Disease can soon guzzle new gluten-free Coors beer | WTVR.com.

Gluten-Free Craze Is Boon And Bane For Those With Celiac Disease

Gluten is the dietary boogeyman du jour.

And for people with celiac disease, a serious autoimmune disorder, gluten — a protein found in wheat, rye and barley — really is the boogeyman, triggering painful gastrointestinal inflammation and other symptoms. For these people, the phenomenal popularity of gluten-free diets has been both a blessing and a curse.

via Gluten-Free Craze Is Boon And Bane For Those With Celiac Disease : The Salt : NPR.

Celiac Disease Among UK Kids Has Tripled

Over the last 20 years, celiac disease, an autoimmune reaction to gluten, has tripled among children in the United Kingdom, a new study shows.The new data, published in the journal Archives of Disease in Childhood, shows that while 1% of all kids in the U.K. have blood markers for the disease, there are socioeconomic disparities among who gets diagnosed.

via Celiac Disease Among UK Kids Has Tripled | TIME.

Baby’s age at gluten exposure not tied to celiac disease

The age at which babies are introduced to foods with gluten doesn’t affect their risk of developing celiac disease, a new study finds.

Earlier studies had suggested that introducing gluten between the ages of four and six months might lower the risk of celiac disease, a condition in which gluten in food triggers a damaging immune response in the small intestines.

But in this new study, children introduced to gluten before age 17 weeks or after 26 weeks were not at an increased risk of developing celiac disease, compared to those who were introduced to the protein between those ages, researchers found.

via Baby’s age at gluten exposure not tied to celiac disease | Reuters.

Researchers Identify Non-Gluten Proteins as Targets of Immune Response to Wheat in Celiac Disease

Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have found that, in addition to gluten, the immune systems of patients with celiac disease react to specific types of non-gluten protein in wheat. The results were reported online in the Journal of Proteome Research.

Gluten proteins, which represent about 75 percent of the total protein content of wheat grain, are known to be the primary triggers of the immune response in celiac disease. While the role of gluten in celiac disease has been extensively studied since the 1950s, the possible involvement of wheat non-gluten proteins has not been characterized and is poorly understood.

“This work is the first to attempt mapping of the B cell response to non-gluten proteins of wheat in celiac disease,” said the study’s principal investigator, Armin Alaedini, PhD, assistant professor of medicine (in the Institute of Human Nutrition and the Celiac Disease Center) at Columbia University.

via Researchers Identify Non-Gluten Proteins as Targets of Immune Response to Wheat in Celiac Disease – Columbia University Medical Center.

ImmusanT Grabs $12M as Celiac Vaccine Hits Critical Proving Ground

ImmusanT is trying to prove that a vaccine it’s developing can help celiac patients eat gluten without getting sick. Today, the Cambridge, MA-based company got enough dough to test that theory in real patients.

ImmusanT has raised a $12 million Series B round from Vatera Healthcare Partners, the New York backer that helped get the startup off the ground in 2011 with a $20 million equity financing. ImmusanT will use the cash to take Nexvax2, the company’s experimental immunotherapy for celiac disease, through a Phase 2 proof-of-concept study. It’s the first time Nexvax2 will be tested in patients with the disorder—a critical moment in the company’s progression. Those studies are expected to begin in early 2015.

via ImmusanT Grabs $12M as Celiac Vaccine Hits Critical Proving Ground | Xconomy.